With Trusted Traveler certification, you’re off to the safest places

Welcome to Travel Risk Advisories (TradAVAs), a fun little thing we came up with. And it’s so great that we did. The concept is simple: We sought the highest-rated U.S. travel destinations by location….

With Trusted Traveler certification, you’re off to the safest places

Welcome to Travel Risk Advisories (TradAVAs), a fun little thing we came up with. And it’s so great that we did. The concept is simple: We sought the highest-rated U.S. travel destinations by location. I took the rest of your questions. Note: If you have a travel issue, we’ll be sharing our Trusted Traveler status.

Q: If you (i.e., Canadians) review travel recommendations for Cuba or Brazil, which destination comes first, South America or North America?

A: Go to Canada Tourism. (At my request, they are going to change it to Brazil Tourism. I know it was snooty for them to do so, but — hey, win some, lose some.)

Q: What’s the fastest-growing country’s travel threat right now?

A: Canada. Also, please, please don’t ask whether we like going to Africa. The world is a better place for knowing where it is, not knowing where it isn’t.

Q: U.S. citizens aren’t allowed to travel to Cuba. Why aren’t Canadians banned? What does “unacceptable risk” mean?

A: You probably got the drift, but the answer is you can’t go to Cuba — ever — unless the government decides you can. Whether you can go is related to how fast a country adds your name to their blacklist. (Canada tends to follow the U.S.’s lead.) Over the years, both countries have approved travel from their airlines. During the Obama years, Cuban and Canadian passports were signed on to an official list of TAs, so there was less paperwork involved. It’s now a team effort: BOTH countries often weigh things like difficulty finding hotels, not being able to change plane reservations and – gasp – routine medical emergencies.

Q: Is it any riskier to go to Japan (April-October) than anywhere else?

A: This can be hard to get your head around. There are lots of places where in-country travel can be totally unpredictable. Those would be places like France, China and London. That said, there have been terrorist attacks in Japan (damn you, Daewoo!) and you’ll see lots of natural disasters, too. In general, however, the biggest worry is local sanitation.

Q: The Lower 48 has 50 states. Canada has four. How does TAA categorize them?

A: Technically, they are not states, but on a risk-assessment scale, it can seem as if you’re floating in circles. For example, Costa Rica is rated as a T, but arguably only has two countries on that scale. See how you do in this rule. We’re almost done, and you’ll see your step-by-step procedure below.

Note: TrustedTraveler.com is a free travel guide that lets you know about fraud, lawsuits and other dangers before you travel anywhere. You can see all of our latest alerts and check our trusted travel-risk-assessment list, what we call a “report card,” which ranks destinations worldwide.

You can also get travel alerts from across the globe at worldexpert.travel.

© 2019, Washington Post Content Solutions for Washington Post Writers Group

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